By Marcel van der Veer
05-07-2018

Published in category HiFi

More on Electronics, HiFi, Vintage HiFi

When I was young I used to tinker a lot with electronics. It started with building simple crystal radios that I would listen to at night, long antenna in the bedroom, head below the blankets otherwise you would not hear a thing. It ended with building a SSB short-wave receiver and again I spent endless nights listening to radio amateurs from around the world … CQ DX? … CQ DX? ….

Those were the years when young Jobs and Gates made enter computers into people's homes and once Torvalds made his mark my interest in electronics yielded to endless hours spent on developing Algol 68 Genie. So little time, so many interesting things to do …

Another passion of mine is music, mainly classical. Bach, Mozart, Beethoven, Wagner, Bruckner, Mahler, Rachmaninov, Pärt, I cannot hear enough. I have therefore also a keen interest in sound HiFi equipment.

Lately I needed to call on some of my now rusty electronics skills since I came into some older HiFi equipment in need of attention. I consulted the world wide web in search of service manuals and found many more people with an interest in keeping older HiFi in working condition. Now I had the opportunity to combine my passion for electronics, HiFi equipment and music … and do not forget durability, since we are actually extending the life of otherwise obsolete products.

Onkyo Integra T4057

I am the proud owner of a recent DAB+ receiver. DAB+ should be the answer to hiss and static in FM reception. Indeed, tuner performance is nice, though I needed an antenna amplifier to get sufficient quality digital signal. Thirty years ago, engineers had to make the best of analogue FM radio. Brands like Luxman and Onkyo were really good at making high quality tuners. So I was pleasantly surprised to find at a thrift shop an Onkyo Integra T4057 that dates from the late 1980's.

I hooked it up to the DAB+ receiver but had to conclude that the DAB+ tuner sounded better than this once high-end tuner. Time to take the unit apart for inspection! The power supply had a large filter electrolytic capacitor that operated at an effective voltage only few Volts below the elco's maximum voltage so I supposed that after 30 years the elco would be quite dull.

I searched my soldering iron that I had not used for many years and replaced the elco's in the power supply but also the ones in the signal path - this time with maximum voltages well above actual load. The dead power indicator I replaced by a blue led to give it a contemporary touch. The unit was a bit scratched so I subtly retouched the front with a little black paint.

Marcel van der Veer
Onkyo Integra T4057 during repair.

After this not too difficult operation, the unit sounds crystal clear and very musical, a nice open sound stage, really pleasant. Now it is the DAB+ tuner that sounds a bit dull in comparison … though the DAB+ tuner has no hiss. At normal listening levels, the hiss of the T4057 is hardly noticeable. Since I like to listen in the evening hours, after a while I found the blue led too bright in dim light, so I replaced it again by an orange one.

Onkyo DX1400

As said I like classical music and always have music playing while I am engaged in domestic activities. Even though vinyl makes a come-back, I will not part from my CD collection.

I do not want to start yet another discussion on whether vinyl is nicer than CD or vice versa. Arguments from physics, graphs and measurements are not the complete story - your personality and esthetic preferences makes the way you experience your music unique. For me that is CDs in their cute jewel cases and discrete solid state amps, for another person it will be vinyl with beautiful cover art and tube amps, and a next person may prefer flacc and not care for cover art at all.

I do have a modern CD player but I found, also in a thrift shop, a nice Onkyo CD player from the early 1990's. That was the time when I bought my first Onkyo HiFi set so this find brought back sweet memories. This one is equipped with 8 times oversampled 18 bit DACs, which at the time sounded really nice compared to 4 times oversampled 16 bit DACs which were common back then. The price was right so I decided to take it home … if it would work it would be a bargain, if not I would have had hours of fun in trying to make it work.

The Onkyo needed thorough cleaning since it was dusty on the inside as well as on the outside. At first the unit seemed to play well. It would even play scratched CD's indicating that the laser is still working well - this unit has a Sony mechanism that was known for its sturdy laser.

However, after some days its little problem showed up. It would load a disc only to throw it back at me. At first occasionally, later any disc was rejected. I had little to loose, and took the Sony mechanism apart. I quickly found the culprit - a rubber belt in the loading mechanism had stretched too much for the tray to close completely - the laser tried to find the initial track on the slightly misaligned disc, and after some seconds the unit gave up and ejected the disc.

I searched the webshops and to my surprise found replacement belts for this exact mechanism. However, since the rubber belt only needs to open and close the tray, a bit of wow or flutter would not matter. I simply replaced it with an equally sized O-seal from the plumbing department of the local DIY store. This is of course not recommended for cassette decks or turntables that need decent belts to avoid wow and flutter.

Marcel van der Veer
Onkyo DX1400, below with belt substitute.

I also gave a minute dab of silicon-grease as lubricant here and there to make the tray and laser transport move easily again. After using the unit for a day or so I removed any excess lubricant. The unit works fine consistently since this 50 cents repair.

Compared to my recent player (optical interconnect to the DAC in the receiver), this 25 year old player (analogue interconnect to the receiver) comes quite close - the new one having slightly clearer bass. The DX1400 must be delicately trimmed for optimal performance (there are several trimmers in the unit that you touch at your own peril) while the later single-bitters do not require such fine-tuning - after 25 years this might have influenced slightly the performance of the DX1400; however, I really enjoy the unit.

Again I was surprised what engineers could accomplish at the time with the material at hand, which almost makes you suspect that all that has been achieved in all this time is making players cheaper to produce …

Denon POA-F100

The equipment I described above is in my study which is a small room that does not allow for large speakers; bookshelf speakers are the only possibility in this room. The size of the room also rules out using a subwoofer: the wavelength of low bass tones is too large for the room which would result in an inconsistent bass reproduction. The bookshelf speakers themselves are almost vintage: a pair of Mission 731's that formerly formed the rear channel in a Dolby Surround system. I also happened to have the corresponding Mission 73C center speaker of that Dolby Surround system. The receiver I currently own is a two-channel device, so the 73C was sitting idly on top of a bookshelf.

In my small study the 731's perform quite well though the sound stage could be more firmly centered, by which I mean that when I move around the room, the sound stage moves with my position which is a bit weird. I wanted to test whether the 73C could help … but then I would need an extra amp to connect to the receiver's subwoofer pre-out, a mono channel without crossover. One good day I found a Denon POA F100, a three-channel power-amp for combination with a matching receiver that was not on offer; both units together would form a five channel surround system. This cute little unit has comparable wattage as the receiver driving the 731's, so I decided to buy it to drive the 73C.

I could not find a service manual for the amp. Upon connecting the unit to the mains, the power indicator seemed dead though the speaker relays engaged, which was a good sign. Then I tested the unit with a test source in such way that if the amp was faulty, it would not cause serious damage. It appeared that the power inidicator lights up once the unit is connected to peripheral equipment. In the end, all the unit needed was a good cleaning, and since the pre-amp (Onkyo) and power-amp (Denon) are not the same brand, an attenuator was needed to bring the 73C back at the volume of the 731's. I improvised the attenuator with a 20 kΩ trimmer soldered onto a twin RCA plug - I spliced an interconnect into two mono cables to connect pre-amp to attenuator and attenuator to the power-amp. The trimmer was set to a level at which the 73C just matches the 731's.

Marcel van der Veer
Denon POA F100, top cover removed.

With the 73C in between the 731's the sound stage indeed is more firmly centered. Unfortunately the subwoofer pre-out has no crossover and the high tones emitted from the 73C influenced the stereo image. Now I needed a low-pass filter to dampen the high tones, with a crossover frequency just below the lowest frequency of the tweeter in the 73C and with no phase shift at all to not make the sound muddy.

Below photo shows an alternative solution that works well enough - instead of more electronics, a small wooden panel in front of the 73C (but not closing the bass-reflex port) disperses the sound of the tweeter enough to mitigate the influence on the stereo image. Effectively the wooden panel is my low-pass filter with zero phase shift! Note that this solution works in my small study. Another room may well require another solution.

Marcel van der Veer
Mission 73C with simple wood panel as improvised zero-phase-shift low-pass filter.


All blog posts


Marcel van der Veer Algol68C on MVS revisited

04-08-2018

As the author of Algol 68 Genie I am interested in having access to other Algol 68 compilers for reference purposes. Several years ago I wrote a post on installing Algol68C on MVS. In this post I would like to give an update.

Algol68C Release 1.3039 is derived from the compiler that was in service to the mid 1990's on IBM mainframes and runs on either MVT or MVS. MVT and MVS developed into today's z/OS that is backward compatible with its predecessors. I used Release 1.303 at the University of Nijmegen under VM/CMS … [Read more]

Published in category Algol 68


Marcel van der Veer Let the music play on - vintage HiFi

05-07-2018

Lately I needed to call on some of my now rusty electronics skills since I came into some older HiFi equipment in need of attention. I consulted the world wide web in search of service manuals and found many more people with an interest in keeping older HiFi in working condition. Now I had the opportunity to combine my passion for electronics, HiFi equipment and music … and do not forget durability, since we are actually extending the life of otherwise obsolete products … [Read more]

Published in category HiFi


Marcel van der Veer Building a small Beowulf cluster II

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As described in an earlier post, at home I operate a modest Beowulf type cluster for embarrassingly parallel simulation runs in batch mode. With the experience from that build, I took on building a higher-performance cluster using Debian … [Read more]

Published in category Science


Marcel van der Veer Be multilingual!

28-01-2018

Every year my daughter's high school invites parents to partake in an evening of information sessions, to help students orient themselves on their future. The idea is to have parents from all walks of professional life, each parent discussing half an hour or so with small groups of students who subscribed to your sessions. You are expected to tell about your study and career, and the students are supposed to pose questions. As you will expect, some come well prepared, others have to be stimulated a bit. I greatly enjoy those conversations with the next generation who have their lifes ahead of them … [Read more]

Published in category Education


Marcel van der Veer Classical thermodynamics in a nutshell

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Recently I met during an event at my Alma Mater, the University of Nijmegen, my high school physics teacher. We discussed the chemistry curriculum, and remarked that quite some chemistry students capture with difficulty the fundamental principles from thermodynamics. Needless to say that thermodynamics is one of those subjects that serve a chemist for a lifetime. In my humble opinion, one reason for this lack of retention may be the abstraction level in freshmen courses, and that this might be improved by spending one or two introductory hours on the basic ideas of thermodynamics in a historic context … [Read more]

Published in category Science


Marcel van der Veer A brief history of Algol 68 Genie

27-11-2016

Being the author of Algol 68 Genie, people frequently ask me why a physical chemist wrote an Algol 68 compiler. This is an understandable question since people associate Algol 68 with the learned group of mathematicians and computer scientists that conceived the language some fifty years ago, and people recall the reputation it had of being an hard to implement laguage. In this post I would like to give an account of how Algol 68 Genie came to be … [Read more]

Published in category Algol 68


Marcel van der Veer Building a small Beowulf cluster

01-10-2016

At home I operate a modest Beowulf type cluster for embarrassingly parallel simulation runs in batch mode. A master node controls several drones. Nodes in this cluster need no more than a server installation, but if a drone happens to have keyboard, mouse and monitor a small GUI is nice to have … [Read more]

Published in category Science


Marcel van der Veer Running Algol68C on MVS

31-10-2012

Recently, Algol68C Release 1.3039 was made public for download. This release is derived from the compiler that was in service to the mid 1990's on IBM mainframes. The new release is meant to run on either MVT or MVS. This report documents the installation of the new release on emulated MVS/370 … [Read more]

Published in category Algol 68


Marcel van der Veer Revised Report on the Algorithmic Language Algol 68

01-06-2009

This is a translation of the Algol 68 Revised Report into HTML, for distribution with Algol 68 Genie, an Open Source Algol 68 interpreter. Since Algol 68 Genie became available on the Internet, it has become clear that there still are many people who are interested in an Algol 68 implementation, the majority of them being mathematicians or computer scientists. Hence it is expected that there are also people interested in having access to the formal defining document, the Algol 68 Revised Report, which unfortunately is out of print. It is believed that a HTML translation may well meet this need and enable people to study the formal description of Algol 68, a language that over the years has caused much debate (these debates may well be another raison d'être for this HTML translation) … [Read more]

Published in category Algol 68